BAFTA NOMINATED DIRECTOR HIGHLIGHTS UK’S IMPORTANCE OF EYESIGHT AND ITS IMPACT WITH POIGNANT BLURRY FILM

  • 66% of UK adults admit to experiencing issues with blurred vision
  • College of Optometrists has teamed up with BAFTA award-nominated director Mark Nunneley to release the first completely blurred film to highlight the issue

He is part of the Ridley Scott creative group, so Mark Nunneley knows how to make a film that will stand out in your memory. In a career spanning over two decades, the film director has produced and directed award-winning TV comedy commercials, music videos and short films. 

His latest creation might have you adjusting your TV set though, because it is shot entirely out of focus.

The film called “Focus on Life” has been launched today by College of Optometrists as part of a campaign to address the alarming number of people who are living their lives with impaired or damaged vision without realising it.

The film follows the life stories of four people, but the camera mimics the eyes of a person with defective eyesight and blurred vision to raise awareness of the importance of eye health and features the little things that those with good eyesight may take for granted, from a walk along a beach to fishing from a boat.

Mark’s film comes as findings from the College of Optometrists has discovered that 66% of us admit to experiencing blurred vision and 35% believe their eyesight has markedly deteriorated in the last two years.

Even when our vision becomes blurry, one in 10 of us admit we simply move closer to the screen.

The UK’s denial that they have blurred vision is evident. 18% struggle with everyday tasks because of poor eyesight. Of those that have had an eye test, 20% admit their results showed their vision was worse than they expected with a further 39% admitting they should get their eyes tested more often than they do.

Shockingly, almost a quarter (23%) of parents also admit they never take their children to the optician with 38% of us feeling our lives would be more fulfilling if we could see better.