BRITISH SUNDAY ROAST TRADITION TO BECOME MEATLESS BY 2030

A THIRD OF BRITS UNDER 34 WOULD BE OPEN TO REPLACING MEAT WITH A VEGAN OPTION

Banana bread baking was a big trend in the first lockdown but is now the time to expand our culinary skills? With Christmas fast approaching, can we make use of our time indoors to polish up on our roast recipes?

It was in the 1700s that Sunday lunch became an established tradition with households gathering to enjoy a large meal after church to mark the end of one week and the start of another.

Food historian and author Dr Polly Russell believes even though household makeup, cooking technology and tastes have changed dramatically, Sunday lunch remains the week’s most significant meal for many people.

Nowadays the tradition consists of relaxing, going for a walk and a roast lunch or dinner. The classic dish is typically made up of a choice of meat, vegetables, and a Yorkshire pudding, topped off with gravy.

Research by allplants, reveals only 27% of Brits think meat is the best part of a Sunday Roast, with Roast Potatoes topping the charts as our favourite part.

Nearly 40% of Brits think a large proportion of the dish will be meatless in 10 years. The survey also shows that if people had to pick anything to replace meat, just under 30% would choose a vegan meat replacement followed by roast potatoes (29%) and Yorkshire pudding (26%).

1 in 6 families say they need to accommodate a meat-free option for at least one person.

Surprisingly nearly 1 in 5 of Brits have never cooked a Sunday roast for their family. The main reasons that stop people from making the classic dish, starts with 26% saying it takes too much time to prepare, too much washing up afterwards 17% and 12% think it costs too much.

About 11% prefer to eat out and 7% don’t know how to cook a roast.